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Most Lovable Dogs for Your Kids……and You

KIDS!!!  Who let the dogs out………..

The look in you children’s eyes as you walk through the pet store.

“Dad, I want a Tarantula!”

“We are not getting a Tarantula!”

“How about a snake…….oooooohhh, this one rattles!”

“No, we are not getting a poisonous snake!”

You walk around the corner, and there they are, little tiny dogs for you little tiny human.

Your child lights up and runs to look, to touch, and to play.

But what dogs are the best dogs for your child? What dogs with a temperament to handle kids? What dogs will be protective for your child? Here are a few ideas to help you with your decision.

Collie

collie
The well-bred Collie is sweet, friendly, and gentle. She is a family dog and enjoys being part of all household activities. Especially fond of kids, she enjoys playing with them and protectively watching over them.If those qualities weren’t positive enough, the Collie tops them with her intelligence and loyalty. This dog is smart and learns quickly.And her devotion? She would probably swim through shark-infested waters to save her owner!

 

Golden Retriever

golden-retriever
A sweet, calm nature is the hallmark of the breed. The Golden was bred to work with people, and is eager to please his owner. Though hard-wired with a good disposition, like all dogs the Golden must be well-raised and well-trained to make the most of his heritage.Like every dog, the Golden needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Golden puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
 

 

Australian Shepherd

shepherd

Bred to be pushy with livestock, Australian Shepherds can and will take the dominant role in the home if you don’t give them firm and confident leadership. This makes them a poor choice for first-time or timid owners. Like many herding dogs, Australian Shepherds are by nature loyal to their family but standoffish with strangers. They need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Aussie puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

 

Dalmatian

Born to run, the Dalmatian is a high-energy dog with an endless capacity for exercise. He loves attention and has a strong desire to please, making him easy to train through positive reinforcement such as food rewards, praise, and play. He’s a smart dog with a sly sense of humor, and will do his best to make you laugh. The Dalmatian is alert and interested in everything that goes on around him and makes an excellent watchdog. Like every dog, the Dalmatian needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dalmatian puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

 
 

Beagle

beagle

Beagles are gentle, sweet, and funny. They will make you laugh, but that’s when they’re not making you cry because of their often naughty behavior. Beagle people spend a lot of time trying to outthink their dogs, and they often must resort to food rewards to lure the Beagle into a state of temporary obedience. Like every dog, the Beagle needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Beagle puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

 
 
 

German Shepherd

german shepherd

The German Shepherd personality is aloof but not usually aggressive. They’re reserved dogs; they don’t make friends immediately, but once they do, they’re extremely loyal. With their family, they’re easy-going and approachable, but when threatened, they can be strong and protective, making them excellent watchdogs. This highly intelligent and trainable breed thrives on having a job to do—any job. The German Shepherd can be trained to do almost anything, from alerting a deaf person to a doorbell ring to sniffing out an avalanche victim. One thing they’re not good at is being alone for long periods of time. Without the companionship they need—as well as exercise and the chance to put their intelligence to work—they become bored and frustrated. A German Shepherd who’s under-exercised and ignored by their family is likely to express pent-up energy in ways you don’t like, such as barking and chewing. Like every dog, the German Shepherd needs early socialization—exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences—when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your German Shepherd puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

This is just a few of the amazing variety of dogs that surround us. However there are also a large variety of dogs without homes.  Take the time and look into adoption for some of these lost dogs.

 

*Update*

The Genuine Dad family just added our own addition to the family. This little puppy had been scheduled to be euthanized, a polite way of saying scheduled to die. When you adopt a puppy from one of these programs, you truly are saving a life!

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